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Kimberly MacKenzie, president of Kim's Clothes Inc., a medium-sized manufacturer of women's casual clothing, is worried. Her firm has been selling clothes to Russ Brothers department store for more than ten years, and she has never experienced any problems in collecting payment for the merchandise sold. Currently, Russ Brothers owes Kim's Clothes $65,000 for spring sportswear that was delivered to the store just two weeks ago. Kim's concern was brought about by an article that appeared in yesterday's Wall Street Journal that indicated that Russ Brothers was having serious financial problems. Further, the article stated that Russ Brothers' management was considering filing for reorganization, or even liquidation, with a federal bankruptcy court. Kim's immediate concern was whether or not her firm would collect its receivables if Russ Brothers went bankrupt. In pondering the situation, Kim also realized that she knew nothing about the process that firms go through when they encounter severe financial distress. To learn more about bankruptcy, reorganization, and liquidation, Kim asked Ron Mitchell, the firm's chief financial officer, to prepare a briefing on the subject for the entire board of directors. In turn, Ron asked you, a newly hired financial analyst, to do the groundwork for the briefing by answering the following questions: What are the major causes of business failure?

2 Replies
Started by Kate_Bona
Last post Best Answer Reply by Janelle
Kimberly MacKenzie, president of Kim's Clothes Inc., a medium-sized manufacturer of women's casual clothing, is worried. Her firm has been selling clothes to Russ Brothers department store for more than ten years, and she has never experienced any problems in collecting payment for the merchandise sold. Currently, Russ Brothers owes Kim's Clothes $65,000 for spring sportswear that was delivered to the store just two weeks ago. Kim's concern was brought about by an article that appeared in yesterday's Wall Street Journal that indicated that Russ Brothers was having serious financial problems. Further, the article stated that Russ Brothers' management was considering filing for reorganization, or even liquidation, with a federal bankruptcy court. Kim's immediate concern was whether or not her firm would collect its receivables if Russ Brothers went bankrupt. In pondering the situation, Kim also realized that she knew nothing about the process that firms go through when they encounter severe financial distress. To learn more about bankruptcy, reorganization, and liquidation, Kim asked Ron Mitchell, the firm's chief financial officer, to prepare a briefing on the subject for the entire board of directors. In turn, Ron asked you, a newly hired financial analyst, to do the groundwork for the briefing by answering the following questions: What are the major causes of business failure?

2 Replies
Started by Helen
Last post Best Answer Reply by doctormega
Kimberly MacKenzie, president of Kim's Clothes Inc., a medium-sized manufacturer of women's casual clothing, is worried. Her firm has been selling clothes to Russ Brothers department store for more than ten years, and she has never experienced any problems in collecting payment for the merchandise sold. Currently, Russ Brothers owes Kim's Clothes $65,000 for spring sportswear that was delivered to the store just two weeks ago. Kim's concern was brought about by an article that appeared in yesterday's Wall Street Journal that indicated that Russ Brothers was having serious financial problems. Further, the article stated that Russ Brothers' management was considering filing for reorganization, or even liquidation, with a federal bankruptcy court. Kim's immediate concern was whether or not her firm would collect its receivables if Russ Brothers went bankrupt. In pondering the situation, Kim also realized that she knew nothing about the process that firms go through when they encounter severe financial distress. To learn more about bankruptcy, reorganization, and liquidation, Kim asked Ron Mitchell, the firm's chief financial officer, to prepare a briefing on the subject for the entire board of directors. In turn, Ron asked you, a newly hired financial analyst, to do the groundwork for the briefing by answering the following questions: What are the major causes of business failure?

2 Replies
Started by Cirri
Last post Best Answer Reply by Cristal
Kimberly MacKenzie, president of Kim's Clothes Inc., a medium-sized manufacturer of women's casual clothing, is worried. Her firm has been selling clothes to Russ Brothers department store for more than ten years, and she has never experienced any problems in collecting payment for the merchandise sold. Currently, Russ Brothers owes Kim's Clothes $65,000 for spring sportswear that was delivered to the store just two weeks ago. Kim's concern was brought about by an article that appeared in yesterday's Wall Street Journal that indicated that Russ Brothers was having serious financial problems. Further, the article stated that Russ Brothers' management was considering filing for reorganization, or even liquidation, with a federal bankruptcy court. Kim's immediate concern was whether or not her firm would collect its receivables if Russ Brothers went bankrupt. In pondering the situation, Kim also realized that she knew nothing about the process that firms go through when they encounter severe financial distress. To learn more about bankruptcy, reorganization, and liquidation, Kim asked Ron Mitchell, the firm's chief financial officer, to prepare a briefing on the subject for the entire board of directors. In turn, Ron asked you, a newly hired financial analyst, to do the groundwork for the briefing by answering the following questions: What are the major causes of business failure?

2 Replies
Started by Zeanique
Last post Best Answer Reply by Gladymar
Kimberly MacKenzie, president of Kim's Clothes Inc., a medium-sized manufacturer of women's casual clothing, is worried. Her firm has been selling clothes to Russ Brothers department store for more than ten years, and she has never experienced any problems in collecting payment for the merchandise sold. Currently, Russ Brothers owes Kim's Clothes $65,000 for spring sportswear that was delivered to the store just two weeks ago. Kim's concern was brought about by an article that appeared in yesterday's Wall Street Journal that indicated that Russ Brothers was having serious financial problems. Further, the article stated that Russ Brothers' management was considering filing for reorganization, or even liquidation, with a federal bankruptcy court. Kim's immediate concern was whether or not her firm would collect its receivables if Russ Brothers went bankrupt. In pondering the situation, Kim also realized that she knew nothing about the process that firms go through when they encounter severe financial distress. To learn more about bankruptcy, reorganization, and liquidation, Kim asked Ron Mitchell, the firm's chief financial officer, to prepare a briefing on the subject for the entire board of directors. In turn, Ron asked you, a newly hired financial analyst, to do the groundwork for the briefing by answering the following questions: What are the major causes of business failure?

2 Replies
Started by Fungi
Last post Best Answer Reply by Purplex
Kimberly MacKenzie, president of Kim's Clothes Inc., a medium-sized manufacturer of women's casual clothing, is worried. Her firm has been selling clothes to Russ Brothers department store for more than ten years, and she has never experienced any problems in collecting payment for the merchandise sold. Currently, Russ Brothers owes Kim's Clothes $65,000 for spring sportswear that was delivered to the store just two weeks ago. Kim's concern was brought about by an article that appeared in yesterday's Wall Street Journal that indicated that Russ Brothers was having serious financial problems. Further, the article stated that Russ Brothers' management was considering filing for reorganization, or even liquidation, with a federal bankruptcy court. Kim's immediate concern was whether or not her firm would collect its receivables if Russ Brothers went bankrupt. In pondering the situation, Kim also realized that she knew nothing about the process that firms go through when they encounter severe financial distress. To learn more about bankruptcy, reorganization, and liquidation, Kim asked Ron Mitchell, the firm's chief financial officer, to prepare a briefing on the subject for the entire board of directors. In turn, Ron asked you, a newly hired financial analyst, to do the groundwork for the briefing by answering the following questions: What are the major causes of business failure?

2 Replies
Started by Jeanie
Last post Best Answer Reply by jullia
Kimberly MacKenzie, president of Kim's Clothes Inc., a medium-sized manufacturer of women's casual clothing, is worried. Her firm has been selling clothes to Russ Brothers department store for more than ten years, and she has never experienced any problems in collecting payment for the merchandise sold. Currently, Russ Brothers owes Kim's Clothes $65,000 for spring sportswear that was delivered to the store just two weeks ago. Kim's concern was brought about by an article that appeared in yesterday's Wall Street Journal that indicated that Russ Brothers was having serious financial problems. Further, the article stated that Russ Brothers' management was considering filing for reorganization, or even liquidation, with a federal bankruptcy court. Kim's immediate concern was whether or not her firm would collect its receivables if Russ Brothers went bankrupt. In pondering the situation, Kim also realized that she knew nothing about the process that firms go through when they encounter severe financial distress. To learn more about bankruptcy, reorganization, and liquidation, Kim asked Ron Mitchell, the firm's chief financial officer, to prepare a briefing on the subject for the entire board of directors. In turn, Ron asked you, a newly hired financial analyst, to do the groundwork for the briefing by answering the following questions: What are the major causes of business failure?

2 Replies
Started by _stealth_
Last post Best Answer Reply by alanaragon
Kimberly MacKenzie, president of Kim's Clothes Inc., a medium-sized manufacturer of women's casual clothing, is worried. Her firm has been selling clothes to Russ Brothers department store for more than ten years, and she has never experienced any problems in collecting payment for the merchandise sold. Currently, Russ Brothers owes Kim's Clothes $65,000 for spring sportswear that was delivered to the store just two weeks ago. Kim's concern was brought about by an article that appeared in yesterday's Wall Street Journal that indicated that Russ Brothers was having serious financial problems. Further, the article stated that Russ Brothers' management was considering filing for reorganization, or even liquidation, with a federal bankruptcy court. Kim's immediate concern was whether or not her firm would collect its receivables if Russ Brothers went bankrupt. In pondering the situation, Kim also realized that she knew nothing about the process that firms go through when they encounter severe financial distress. To learn more about bankruptcy, reorganization, and liquidation, Kim asked Ron Mitchell, the firm's chief financial officer, to prepare a briefing on the subject for the entire board of directors. In turn, Ron asked you, a newly hired financial analyst, to do the groundwork for the briefing by answering the following questions: What are the major causes of business failure?

2 Replies
Started by Douglas
Last post Best Answer Reply by DragonC
Assume that you have just been hired as a financial analyst by Tennessee Sunshine Inc., a mid-sized Tennessee company that specializes in creating exotic sauces from imported fruits and vegetables. The firm's CEO, Bill Stooksbury, recently returned from an industry corporate executive conference in San Francisco, and one of the sessions he attended was on the pressing need for smaller companies to institute corporate risk management programs. Since no one at Tennessee Sunshine is familiar with the basics of derivatives and corporate risk management, Stooksbury has asked you to prepare a brief report that the firm's executives could use to gain at least a cursory understanding of the topics. To begin, you gathered some outside materials on derivatives and corporate risk management and used these materials to draft a list of pertinent questions that need to be answered. In fact, one possible approach to the paper is to use a question-and-answer format. Now that the questions have been drafted, you have to develop the answers. Why might stockholders be indifferent whether or not a firm reduces the volatility of its cash flows?

2 Replies
Started by minimal_daylight
Last post Best Answer Reply by GeneXa
Assume that you have just been hired as a financial analyst by Tennessee Sunshine Inc., a mid-sized Tennessee company that specializes in creating exotic sauces from imported fruits and vegetables. The firm's CEO, Bill Stooksbury, recently returned from an industry corporate executive conference in San Francisco, and one of the sessions he attended was on the pressing need for smaller companies to institute corporate risk management programs. Since no one at Tennessee Sunshine is familiar with the basics of derivatives and corporate risk management, Stooksbury has asked you to prepare a brief report that the firm's executives could use to gain at least a cursory understanding of the topics. To begin, you gathered some outside materials on derivatives and corporate risk management and used these materials to draft a list of pertinent questions that need to be answered. In fact, one possible approach to the paper is to use a question-and-answer format. Now that the questions have been drafted, you have to develop the answers. Why might stockholders be indifferent whether or not a firm reduces the volatility of its cash flows?

2 Replies
Started by Khamseen
Last post Best Answer Reply by Alpha_Thick
Assume that you have just been hired as a financial analyst by Tennessee Sunshine Inc., a mid-sized Tennessee company that specializes in creating exotic sauces from imported fruits and vegetables. The firm's CEO, Bill Stooksbury, recently returned from an industry corporate executive conference in San Francisco, and one of the sessions he attended was on the pressing need for smaller companies to institute corporate risk management programs. Since no one at Tennessee Sunshine is familiar with the basics of derivatives and corporate risk management, Stooksbury has asked you to prepare a brief report that the firm's executives could use to gain at least a cursory understanding of the topics. To begin, you gathered some outside materials on derivatives and corporate risk management and used these materials to draft a list of pertinent questions that need to be answered. In fact, one possible approach to the paper is to use a question-and-answer format. Now that the questions have been drafted, you have to develop the answers. Why might stockholders be indifferent whether or not a firm reduces the volatility of its cash flows?

2 Replies
Started by Smile92
Last post Best Answer Reply by party_dad
Assume that you have just been hired as a financial analyst by Tennessee Sunshine Inc., a mid-sized Tennessee company that specializes in creating exotic sauces from imported fruits and vegetables. The firm's CEO, Bill Stooksbury, recently returned from an industry corporate executive conference in San Francisco, and one of the sessions he attended was on the pressing need for smaller companies to institute corporate risk management programs. Since no one at Tennessee Sunshine is familiar with the basics of derivatives and corporate risk management, Stooksbury has asked you to prepare a brief report that the firm's executives could use to gain at least a cursory understanding of the topics. To begin, you gathered some outside materials on derivatives and corporate risk management and used these materials to draft a list of pertinent questions that need to be answered. In fact, one possible approach to the paper is to use a question-and-answer format. Now that the questions have been drafted, you have to develop the answers. Why might stockholders be indifferent whether or not a firm reduces the volatility of its cash flows?

2 Replies
Started by Eniaya26
Last post Best Answer Reply by Zmish
Assume that you have just been hired as a financial analyst by Tennessee Sunshine Inc., a mid-sized Tennessee company that specializes in creating exotic sauces from imported fruits and vegetables. The firm's CEO, Bill Stooksbury, recently returned from an industry corporate executive conference in San Francisco, and one of the sessions he attended was on the pressing need for smaller companies to institute corporate risk management programs. Since no one at Tennessee Sunshine is familiar with the basics of derivatives and corporate risk management, Stooksbury has asked you to prepare a brief report that the firm's executives could use to gain at least a cursory understanding of the topics. To begin, you gathered some outside materials on derivatives and corporate risk management and used these materials to draft a list of pertinent questions that need to be answered. In fact, one possible approach to the paper is to use a question-and-answer format. Now that the questions have been drafted, you have to develop the answers. Why might stockholders be indifferent whether or not a firm reduces the volatility of its cash flows?

2 Replies
Started by Love Pink
Last post Best Answer Reply by Localizer
Assume that you have just been hired as a financial analyst by Tennessee Sunshine Inc., a mid-sized Tennessee company that specializes in creating exotic sauces from imported fruits and vegetables. The firm's CEO, Bill Stooksbury, recently returned from an industry corporate executive conference in San Francisco, and one of the sessions he attended was on the pressing need for smaller companies to institute corporate risk management programs. Since no one at Tennessee Sunshine is familiar with the basics of derivatives and corporate risk management, Stooksbury has asked you to prepare a brief report that the firm's executives could use to gain at least a cursory understanding of the topics. To begin, you gathered some outside materials on derivatives and corporate risk management and used these materials to draft a list of pertinent questions that need to be answered. In fact, one possible approach to the paper is to use a question-and-answer format. Now that the questions have been drafted, you have to develop the answers. Why might stockholders be indifferent whether or not a firm reduces the volatility of its cash flows?

2 Replies
Started by Aisha92
Last post Best Answer Reply by Candace
Assume that you have just been hired as a financial analyst by Tennessee Sunshine Inc., a mid-sized Tennessee company that specializes in creating exotic sauces from imported fruits and vegetables. The firm's CEO, Bill Stooksbury, recently returned from an industry corporate executive conference in San Francisco, and one of the sessions he attended was on the pressing need for smaller companies to institute corporate risk management programs. Since no one at Tennessee Sunshine is familiar with the basics of derivatives and corporate risk management, Stooksbury has asked you to prepare a brief report that the firm's executives could use to gain at least a cursory understanding of the topics. To begin, you gathered some outside materials on derivatives and corporate risk management and used these materials to draft a list of pertinent questions that need to be answered. In fact, one possible approach to the paper is to use a question-and-answer format. Now that the questions have been drafted, you have to develop the answers. Why might stockholders be indifferent whether or not a firm reduces the volatility of its cash flows?

2 Replies
Started by La_Bamba
Last post Best Answer Reply by Megatron
Assume that you have just been hired as a financial analyst by Tennessee Sunshine Inc., a mid-sized Tennessee company that specializes in creating exotic sauces from imported fruits and vegetables. The firm's CEO, Bill Stooksbury, recently returned from an industry corporate executive conference in San Francisco, and one of the sessions he attended was on the pressing need for smaller companies to institute corporate risk management programs. Since no one at Tennessee Sunshine is familiar with the basics of derivatives and corporate risk management, Stooksbury has asked you to prepare a brief report that the firm's executives could use to gain at least a cursory understanding of the topics. To begin, you gathered some outside materials on derivatives and corporate risk management and used these materials to draft a list of pertinent questions that need to be answered. In fact, one possible approach to the paper is to use a question-and-answer format. Now that the questions have been drafted, you have to develop the answers. Why might stockholders be indifferent whether or not a firm reduces the volatility of its cash flows?

2 Replies
Started by Suellen
Last post Best Answer Reply by Flying_Bean
Assume that you have just been hired as a financial analyst by Tennessee Sunshine Inc., a mid-sized Tennessee company that specializes in creating exotic sauces from imported fruits and vegetables. The firm's CEO, Bill Stooksbury, recently returned from an industry corporate executive conference in San Francisco, and one of the sessions he attended was on the pressing need for smaller companies to institute corporate risk management programs. Since no one at Tennessee Sunshine is familiar with the basics of derivatives and corporate risk management, Stooksbury has asked you to prepare a brief report that the firm's executives could use to gain at least a cursory understanding of the topics. To begin, you gathered some outside materials on derivatives and corporate risk management and used these materials to draft a list of pertinent questions that need to be answered. In fact, one possible approach to the paper is to use a question-and-answer format. Now that the questions have been drafted, you have to develop the answers. Why might stockholders be indifferent whether or not a firm reduces the volatility of its cash flows?

2 Replies
Started by Commodore64
Last post Best Answer Reply by ogleo22
Hager’s Home Repair Company, a regional hardware chain that specializes in “do-it-yourself” materials and equipment rentals, is cash rich because of several consecutive good years. One of the alternative uses for the excess funds is an acquisition. Doug Zona, Hager’s treasurer and your boss, has been asked to place a value on a potential target, Lyons’ Lighting (LL), a chain that operates in several adjacent states, and he has enlisted your help. The table below indicates Zona’s estimates of LL’s earnings potential if it came under Hager’s management (in millions of dollars). The interest expense listed here includes the interest (1) on LL’s existing debt, which is $55 million at a rate of 9 percent, and (2) on new debt expected to be issued over time to help finance expansion within the new “L division,” the code name given to the target firm. If acquired, LL will face a 40 percent tax rate. Security analysts estimate LL’s beta to be 1.3. The acquisition would not change Lyons’ capital structure, which is 20 percent debt. Zona realizes that Lyons’ Lighting’s business plan also requires certain levels of operating capital and that the annual investment could be significant. The required levels of total net operating capital are listed below. Zona estimates the risk-free rate to be 7 percent and the market risk premium to be 4 percent. He also estimates that free cash flows after 2021 will grow at a constant rate of 6 percent. Following are projections for sales and other items. 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 Net sales $60.00 $90.00 $112.50 $127.50 $139.70 Cost of goods sold (60%) 36.00 54.00 67.50 76.50 83.80 Selling/administrative expense 4.50 6.00 7.50 9.00 11.00 Interest expense 5.00 6.50 6.50 7.00 8.16 Total net operating capital 150.00 150.00 157.50 163.50 168.00 173.0 Hager’s management is new to the merger game, so Zona has been asked to answer some basic questions about mergers as well as to perform the merger analysis. To structure the task, Zona has developed the following questions, which you must answer and then defend to Hager’s board. What are holding companies?

2 Replies
Started by Carrie
Last post Best Answer Reply by 1nightinWC
Hager’s Home Repair Company, a regional hardware chain that specializes in “do-it-yourself” materials and equipment rentals, is cash rich because of several consecutive good years. One of the alternative uses for the excess funds is an acquisition. Doug Zona, Hager’s treasurer and your boss, has been asked to place a value on a potential target, Lyons’ Lighting (LL), a chain that operates in several adjacent states, and he has enlisted your help. The table below indicates Zona’s estimates of LL’s earnings potential if it came under Hager’s management (in millions of dollars). The interest expense listed here includes the interest (1) on LL’s existing debt, which is $55 million at a rate of 9 percent, and (2) on new debt expected to be issued over time to help finance expansion within the new “L division,” the code name given to the target firm. If acquired, LL will face a 40 percent tax rate. Security analysts estimate LL’s beta to be 1.3. The acquisition would not change Lyons’ capital structure, which is 20 percent debt. Zona realizes that Lyons’ Lighting’s business plan also requires certain levels of operating capital and that the annual investment could be significant. The required levels of total net operating capital are listed below. Zona estimates the risk-free rate to be 7 percent and the market risk premium to be 4 percent. He also estimates that free cash flows after 2021 will grow at a constant rate of 6 percent. Following are projections for sales and other items. 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 Net sales $60.00 $90.00 $112.50 $127.50 $139.70 Cost of goods sold (60%) 36.00 54.00 67.50 76.50 83.80 Selling/administrative expense 4.50 6.00 7.50 9.00 11.00 Interest expense 5.00 6.50 6.50 7.00 8.16 Total net operating capital 150.00 150.00 157.50 163.50 168.00 173.0 Hager’s management is new to the merger game, so Zona has been asked to answer some basic questions about mergers as well as to perform the merger analysis. To structure the task, Zona has developed the following questions, which you must answer and then defend to Hager’s board. What are the major types of divestitures?

2 Replies
Started by Kristan
Last post Best Answer Reply by Manda
Hager’s Home Repair Company, a regional hardware chain that specializes in “do-it-yourself” materials and equipment rentals, is cash rich because of several consecutive good years. One of the alternative uses for the excess funds is an acquisition. Doug Zona, Hager’s treasurer and your boss, has been asked to place a value on a potential target, Lyons’ Lighting (LL), a chain that operates in several adjacent states, and he has enlisted your help. The table below indicates Zona’s estimates of LL’s earnings potential if it came under Hager’s management (in millions of dollars). The interest expense listed here includes the interest (1) on LL’s existing debt, which is $55 million at a rate of 9 percent, and (2) on new debt expected to be issued over time to help finance expansion within the new “L division,” the code name given to the target firm. If acquired, LL will face a 40 percent tax rate. Security analysts estimate LL’s beta to be 1.3. The acquisition would not change Lyons’ capital structure, which is 20 percent debt. Zona realizes that Lyons’ Lighting’s business plan also requires certain levels of operating capital and that the annual investment could be significant. The required levels of total net operating capital are listed below. Zona estimates the risk-free rate to be 7 percent and the market risk premium to be 4 percent. He also estimates that free cash flows after 2021 will grow at a constant rate of 6 percent. Following are projections for sales and other items. 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 Net sales $60.00 $90.00 $112.50 $127.50 $139.70 Cost of goods sold (60%) 36.00 54.00 67.50 76.50 83.80 Selling/administrative expense 4.50 6.00 7.50 9.00 11.00 Interest expense 5.00 6.50 6.50 7.00 8.16 Total net operating capital 150.00 150.00 157.50 163.50 168.00 173.0 Hager’s management is new to the merger game, so Zona has been asked to answer some basic questions about mergers as well as to perform the merger analysis. To structure the task, Zona has developed the following questions, which you must answer and then defend to Hager’s board. What merger-related activities are undertaken by investment bankers?

2 Replies
Started by Elastic Girl
Last post Best Answer Reply by Photographer

 

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